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redryder

Stockpiling 100 Watt Lightbulbs anyone?

Our government has mandated that 100 watt incandescant light bulbs go out of production January 1rst. Next year I think we are scheduled to lose the 75 watt light bulbs.

I am in favor of saving energy but I don't like being forced into something I might not like. The CFL's are OK for some areas but a good instant on  incandescant light bulb is a lot safer if you ever need to light a stairwell quickly when you are half asleep. Also, The  incandescant equivalent ratings assigned to the CFL's is just plain innaccurate. In areas where I require bright light for short periods of time, there just isn't much saving from waiting 5 minutes for a lamp to get bright enough to do a 5 minute project. I'd much rather just turn something on and get right with the program, thank you. Where lights need to be left on for extended periods, efficient lighting certainly makes sense if properly deployed so as to give a good lighting experience.

When you go to most stores, all big name branded bulbs are now made in china.
If anyone is interested, you can order American made incandescant bulbs
right here in wattages soon to be history:

http://www.lightbulbsdirect.com/page/001/CTGY/USAIncan

Gil
Dean W

I've been buying a pack of 75 watt incandescents each time I think of it.  I have a number of packs now.  I intend to have
a few hundred before the greenocommies have their way in the special interest White House.  I will use what I want,
when I want.

You should see one of those pitiful florescents trying to light up on my front porch when it's 20 below.  Stinkin'
foreign junk!
And another thing, long as I'm going on;  I have never had one of those "5 Year" florescents last more than two years,
and they cost 4x as much as good tungsten bulbs, which also last two years.  Plus, every one of those "eco" friendly
bulbs has mercury in them.  What a bunch of Kool-aid we got handed with that junk!
You ought to read the OSHA clean up procedure for disposing of a broken florescent twisty bulb.  Like anyone will ever do that!

Thanks Gil.  Better now!  
BK

We've had the "pleasure"?? of those fluro things a while now, I buy brand names, (still made in China) and there is no way they last longer then 1 year, then they start to get dull.  
IndianaRog

Our local Menards store had a sale on regular incandescent bulbs last summer...I laid in over 100 of the 100 and 75 watt sizes.  I put in 9 of them in my basement and not a one has burned out since June with lots of use.

I bought into the curly type flourescents a year ago, equipped my workshop/basement with 9 x 100 watt equivalents.  10 year bulbs they claimed, definitely NOT equal to the wattage they claimed, none lasted more than 6 months, and one broke over my head trying to uscrew the dead bulb, showering me with who knows what noxious crap.  

Never again, not in this house, my incandescent hoard will outlast me  
tmuir

We can now buy halogen bulbs instead the CFL, more energy efficient than regular light bulbs, but not as efficient as CFL, but they do hit full brightness straight away.
I am now starting to replace my CFL with halogen bulbs as they fail now.

If your area does not have a CFL recycling program they are far worse for the environment than the old ones as they contain small amounts of mercury which is not good to go into landfill.
Atticman

Weve had that imposed by Hilary Benn and his merry men a while ago, have a huge stock, as the incandescent ones dropped a lot in price.

Its useful to have a few of the cruddy ones on all night but the light quality is rubbish.

Its as often the case gesture politics    
Pete the steam

Give me the old bulbs any day of the week.

As said the new wiggly ones take that long to provide light you might as well use a candle
Sandman

I have a stock as well. These new bulbs can't be used with a dimmer, as well as all the other disadvantages.

I'll have to get some more in.  
angus

I don't use and haven't used standard high wattage incandescent light bulbs in decades and I have multiple scores, possibly hundreds of lights. Most are essentially low voltage, whether car headlights, flashlight bulbs, LEDs or Christmas light style bulbs. I also have a few CFLs

My coffee table alone has 12 LEDs in 4 fittings, 2 six volt 1/2 watt incandescents, a 75 watt halogen spot, a 3 watt cold cathode fluorescent, and a decorative 20 watt incandescent. and a couple of  LED flashlights for when I can't be bothered to switch that lot on -- although, in fact, most of my lights are computer controlled.

I do actually have a few bare incandescents (very well dimmed) but these are carbon filament lamps from the early 1900s or so. I have of course stashed a couple of boxes of 100w standard bulbs -- although I have no idea what to do with them.
angus

Sandman wrote:
These new bulbs can't be used with a dimmer

Some can't be, but dimmable CFLs and LEDs (much more efficient, if still very expensive) are available.
angus

Re: Stockpiling 100 Watt Lightbulbs anyone?

redryder wrote:
The CFL's are OK for some areas

Indeed they are, but are essentially obsolescent. LEDs aren't quite there yet, but among the most powerful, an instant-on, dimmable Philips Endura 800, manages to provide the equivalent of a 60w incandescent and has a color temperature of 2700K (a very pleasant and warm light). It consumes 12 watts and has a projected life of 25,000 hours. Mind you, it costs around $30, but that is dropping. Other lighting technologies are also in development.

When I bought my first transistor in the late 1950s,  it cost 30 shillings -- more than a Mamod Minor I. Now one can buy a chip containing millions of transistors for pennies. An MM1 would have been a better investment.
St. Paul steam

cfl's

i to like others went the CFL route in an energy saving endeavor, like previously stated, none of the "10" year bulbs lasted over 8 months...not a believer anymore, as the cfl companies knew, no-one would try to claim the warranty...and my blood pressure goes up when ever the 'we know best" Government tries to tell me what i "must" do, when they cant even balance a budget (or even try) for the last 2 years.
angus

I've just come across a video featuring an Endura lamp. Despite the literally cheesy appearance, the phosphor changes color when energized. The light is warm white. The bands are heat sinks.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gXAz95razjU
Steamfan

With all of the problems this country has, our government is controlling of what type of light bulbs we can buy!

Give me a break!
The Denying Dutchman

Dean W wrote:
 Plus, every one of those "eco" friendly
bulbs has mercury in them.  What a bunch of Kool-aid we got handed with that junk!
You ought to read the OSHA clean up procedure for disposing of a broken florescent twisty bulb.  Like anyone will ever do that!

Thanks Gil.  Better now!  


Odd isn't it? Mercury and heavy metal instead of Co2, approved (read forced) by the eco lobby and then there's also something about health risks using CFL's, radiation or something.
Last time I checked trees and plants need Co2 and get killed by mercury and  heavy metals but then again, I'm no scientist so I probably am wrong.  

And yes, I throw broken bulbs in the trash for several reasons:
- If I had to deliver the broken bulbs to a chemical waste depot I have to deliver them by car, which means extra Co2 polution.
- I don't like the idea of a stash of broken bulbs. If the glass breaks, I have harmful substances in my house!
- And third: I highly doubt it that every CFL gets recycled and if they do it's not very clear what happens with the mercury and heavy metals. They only say that the glass and fittings are recycled, so what happens with the nasty stuff?

BTW, as a test I bought Led lights for the living room as a substitute. I can't say I really like the light they produce, but I guess nothing beats the warm glow of a Incandescent light bulb.
The Denying Dutchman

Steamfan wrote:
With all of the problems this country has, our government is controlling of what type of light bulbs we can buy!

Give me a break!


Be glad you live there, here the 100W bulb has been banned for quite a while and in september 2012 European government wants to ban all incandescent light bulbs.
Please tell me how lucky I am to live in Europe, I keep forgetting.  
angus

The Denying Dutchman wrote:
I guess nothing beats the warm glow of a Incandescent light bulb.


Actually nothing beats the warm glow of anything with the right wavelengths and a color temperature in the 2400 to 2800 Kelvin range. The higher it is the colder it seems to be. Red-tinged is 1600, blue-white is 16,000. This was based on the light produced when the famous Scotsman heated a carbon block.

Color
Temperature (typically)

1200° Candlelight
2000° Gaslight
2470° 15 watt incandescent bulb
2565° 60 watt incandescent bulb
2665° 100 watt incandescent bulb
2900° 500 watt Krypton bulb
3100° Projector type filament bulb
3400° Halogen
3900° Carbon arc
4200° Moonlight
30,000° Blue sky
Atticman

I guess its all down to personal preference, its not right that goverments tell us what to do in this area, as others say theres a lot more things that need sorting first.

It the compulsion that irritates. ive used the eco lights for many years in the right place, but that too is personal choice. A few fractured hips due to poor vision isnt environmentally friendly at all!

I have a lovely pair of art deco lights that run off special Phillips lamps, they look awful with any other style. Basically If I hadnt bought a stock in I would have to scrap good light fittings at far more environmental waste than light bulbs.
E=MC2

Incandescent Filiment -Type & Energy Saving Light Bulbs.

Incandescent Filiment -Type & Energy Saving Light Bulbs.

It's ridiculous that they are phasing out traditional Incandescent Filiment -Type Electric Light Bulbs. And I too,have a stockpile of 100 Watt versions. As far as I can see,the new replacement  Energy Saving Light Bulbs just do not
produce the same amount of light as the historic filiment-type
bulbs.
Energy Saving 20 Watt GLS Light Bulbs are supposed be the  equivalent to 100 Watt filiment bulbs  WRONG! The only way to get the same 100 watt light output as the historic and traditional filiment bulbs,is to use two or three at least of the  energy saving bulbs at once in a 3 or more lamp light socket!

Robert.
jaguar+gorgeous+advertisement+car+commercial[1]
angus

Re: Incandescent Filiment -Type & Energy Saving Light Bu

E=MC2 wrote:
Energy Saving 20 Watt GLS Light Bulbs are supposed be the  equivalent to 100 Watt filiment bulbs  WRONG! The only way to get the same 100 watt light output as the historic and traditional filiment bulbs,is to use two or three at least of the  energy saving bulbs at once in a 3 or more lamp light socket!

Actually the only way to get the same light output is not to use the amount of power consumed (the wattage) but to refer to the amount of visible light produced (lumens).  Otherwise it's somewhat like using fuel consumption to gauge a particular car's maximum speed (fine if there's only one model involved).

There certainly have been false claims and no one likes to be told what to do, but the the EU requires that the lumen output be marked on the packaging and has requirements as to what  can be considered equivalent to whatever.  There's a good explanation here:

http://ec.europa.eu/energy/lumen/...choose/packaging/packaging_en.htm
SteamPig

I started using CFL bulbs soon after they became widely available 15 years or so ago - I got very fed up with the incandescents tripping out the entire house lighting circuit whenever one of them blew its filament - which was about every month or so

The old CFLs would take a minute or two to get to full brightness, but they certainly lasted a long time, and when they failed they did NOT trip the lighting circuit - in fact they usually got replaced after 2-3 years because the phosphor had worn out so they went dim.

Moved into current house 4 years ago and replaced the incandescents (yes I've kept them) with CFLs. The standard sizes were much cheaper by then, would light to acceptable brightness within a few seconds, and could be obtained with various 'warmth' of phosphor. Small candle bulbs were just becoming available and these cost an arm and a leg and took several minutes to get to full brightness but that was OK, you just had to think ahead a bit.

Now those first generation bulbs are starting to give up and are getting replaced.

What do you know, the new ones are a bit cheaper in the funny sizes, and start fast, but maybe 30% fail within 3 months, often within a few days. The electronic ballasts (high voltage pumps) are going pop.

So much for the '10000 hours average life' claim on the box. I now always keep the receipts and packaging and take them back to the retailer - so far I have always gotten a full refund. I only accept a replacement if it can be tested before my eyes, as I am now beginning to get dead-on-arrivals, too - no guesses as to what happens to these when I take them back

I look forward with interest to how they manage to make LEDs unreliable so we have to keep on buying them.

On disposal of CFLs, I hope retailers will soon be required to take them back for correct recycling, as they must now do (in the UK) with used batteries if they sell more than a trivial number.
redryder

SteamPig wrote:


I look forward with interest to how they manage to make LEDs unreliable so we have to keep on buying them.

On disposal of CFLs, I hope retailers will soon be required to take them back for correct recycling, as they must now do (in the UK) with used batteries if they sell more than a trivial number.


These are 2 great points.

LED's will become cheaper one day and I hope this doesn't make them a hazard by cheapening up the casing and transformer so much that they can't last. It would make no sense to put a 50,000 hour light in a case with a transformer designed to quit after the 3rd voltage surge.


There is no good disposal method for CFL's that is enforceable. Everyone I know tosses them in a bag with the rest of the garbage. Now that they have cheapened CFL's to the point they fail regularly disposal should be addressed. I know I am not willing to drive for a half hour every time a light bulb fails.
logoman

I've never been comfortable with anything other than halogen light. What're gets me closer to either daylight of candle light is good for me, and the Eco bulbs are a long way from that. I'm happy to pay well over the odds for good light in my lifetime, it's one privelidge i consider worth the money.
mogogear

I use both- and solved many a burn out problem in the old house that we were having with incandescent bulbs. This was due not to the bulbs but to a 100 year old house with some old circuits that had many more lights on them than they used to( we modern folk like more types of lights than they used to )

So the CF bulks solved that problem and I can say that the newer generation of CF bulbs last much longer than the earlier efforts. I get very long life now out of all the bulbs I use - CF and incand.

Since most of the world in office buildings went to florescent many many years ago- I too choose where  they work in my behalf and where they do not.

We have curbside pick up for compostables, recycling and waste - So I merely add these item to the rest of the item I take to our hazardous disposal facility in town. They are dialed in and make it easy really. So these bulbs are added to old batteries, old paint and old chemicals and dropped off once every 6 months or so to all be disposed of as they should be.


I do not like governments telling me what to do ( city state or fed) but I think I read the law to say that bulbs have to be around 30% more efficient in light to energy use to be able to continue sales and use. Incandescent bulbs will have to get better to have a future.

The CF are at that now and the incandescent folks are playing catch up. Bulbs that cannot be made better will not be allowed is how I read the law. The 100 watt and 75 watt bulbs were the biggest offenders ---the NEW 100 watt bulbs ( incandescent ) will have to put out more LUMENS - Light to make the cut.

You may or may not find this article useful


http://www.tampabay.com/features/...-incandescent-light-bulbs/1208795

I fall on both sides of the debate- I hated that laws forced me to wear seat belts, have car insurance and to stop talking on cell phones while driving ( texting too) But I am also glad for the results in most cases..That's why the republicans nor the democrats want me  

So I will continue to use both and choose which works best in each area I need light

So no stockpiling here- Just Waiting to see what( watt) happens with new designs

Cheers
redryder

This has become a very good and informative thread.
Thanks to all for participating!

Gil
johnreid

I agree with many that the biggest victim is the decorative bulb, but hopefully the ban on incandescent bulbs will force engineers to come up with better designs, so in fact in the long run it should result in progress and not just inconvenience, till then it can be a PITA
Wallace

Very interesting thread.

A few years back we had people door knocking to install these new CF bulbs for free (plus water saving showerheads but that's another story). There was no catch and it was a government scheme.
I declined as so many told me how bad these bulbs were.

I had an electrician doing some work and asked him about them.

This was the advice to me.
The freebies were under 10W (or thereabouts) so don't get them.
Don't buy cheap brands, mirabella or Osram. Phillips are the best.
Get cool white or warm white, don't get the day light ones as they give off a blue colour.
Finally, get at least 20W as that is equivalent to 100W.

Prior to this I had incandescents. I had replaced a couple and noted on the fitting that the Watts should be nor bigger than 60 or 75. Past owner had 100W in them. Further investigating showed it was a fire risk. I don't know why, maybe because all fittings had the glass ball over them (heat buildup?) One or 2 100W that I replaced with 60W gave poor light.

So I took on board the electricans advice, but being tight I didn't buy phillips. I think I got Osram but they were guaranteed for 2 years.

These 20W cool white CFs were great, much brighter than a 60W incandescent. They were bright to switch on, then over about 10secs they hit full brightness. Ideal for the job I have of getting up in the dark.
The downside was they were lucky to last 6months and even in that time they varied greatly. Some lasting a month, some 6.
I took them back to the shop and got a replacement. They blew and so on.

I'm still yet to try the phillips brand. The ones I am using are good besides the short life, but not out of pocket as I keep taking blown ones back.

Incandescents are banned altogether here. You can buy torch bulbs and maybe ones a bit bigger, but standard house bulbs... nope.

I do think it's wrong that this banning can be done. Of further concern is a mate of mine who is a firey says they have had a number catch fire. In one case the woman was home and could smell burning. In checking the CF bulb had caught fire dripping burning plastic to the floor. It didn't trip the breaker despite it being in working condition. In all other cases the bulb had burnt, dripped hot plastic to the floor but caused no fire.

A quick search of "cf bulb fires" does show it is a hazard
Steamfan

The Denying Dutchman wrote:
Steamfan wrote:
With all of the problems this country has, our government is controlling of what type of light bulbs we can buy!

Give me a break!


Be glad you live there, here the 100W bulb has been banned for quite a while and in september 2012 European government wants to ban all incandescent light bulbs.
Please tell me how lucky I am to live in Europe, I keep forgetting.  


Do you suppose that's where our government got the idea?
redryder

I have learned something new as I wasn't aware of the fire hazard. (thanks Wallace) Of course if there is a fire hazard, I question the logic of using them at all. Yes, they save on electricity but what is the true final cost including proper disposal, losses due to fire, mercury contamination, etc.?

("A recent environmental agency report estimates the potential cost to recycle one disposal container (wheelie-bin) of approximately 240 litres or 63.4 US gallons of CFL bulbs at $1,300. This cost ultimately falls on the taxpayer.")

Here is some info:

http://www.wattworks.com/CFL%20Hazards.htm
tmuir

redryder wrote:

("A recent environmental agency report estimates the potential cost to recycle one disposal container (wheelie-bin) of approximately 240 litres or 63.4 US gallons of CFL bulbs at $1,300. This cost ultimately falls on the taxpayer.")

Here is some info:

http://www.wattworks.com/CFL%20Hazards.htm


Thats interesting Gil.
Here in OZ at the local shopping centres  they have battery and CFL recycling bins.
These are run by private companies that recycle both batteries and CFL and sell the products at a profit.

The fire risk is real with any fluorescent light.
At one of our facilities recently we had a ballast get that hot it started emitting a burning smell.
Luckily it was noticed and our fire systems isolated before it caused about $150,000 worth of FM200 fire suppressant being dumped.
With the large fluro tubes it is recommended to replace them every couple of years as when they get older it puts more strain on the ballast to turn them on, until the day it may catch fire.
redryder

tmuir wrote:
redryder wrote:

("A recent environmental agency report estimates the potential cost to recycle one disposal container (wheelie-bin) of approximately 240 litres or 63.4 US gallons of CFL bulbs at $1,300. This cost ultimately falls on the taxpayer.")

Here is some info:

http://www.wattworks.com/CFL%20Hazards.htm


Thats interesting Gil.
Here in OZ at the local shopping centres  they have battery and CFL recycling bins.
These are run by private companies that recycle both batteries and CFL and sell the products at a profit.

.


Is there any way you can check to see if your government pays some of the cost to these private companies so as to allow them to operate at a profit (a bit like the way 4 governments subsidize Airbus). Or perhaps is there enough to be made from recycling batteries to offset the other?
tmuir

redryder wrote:


Is there any way you can check to see if your government pays some of the cost to these private companies so as to allow them to operate at a profit (a bit like the way 4 governments subsidize Airbus). Or perhaps is there enough to be made from recycling batteries to offset the other?


I can tell you that big gel cell batteries are well worth recycling, don't know about smaller batteries that we use in kids toys, but about a year ago I had 3 or 4 tonnes of gel cell batteries replaced in the 2 small UPSs at my work and sold the old batteires for about $400 to recyclers for our BBQ fund.

But a quick search proves you are correct that the battery recyling program is part funded by the government.
http://www.emrc.org.au/household-battery-recycling.html

Several things the study that you mentioned that put a price on the recycling that it didn't take into account are the offset costs.
Less landfill.
Recycling the product may produce less pollution than refining new material (recycling aluminium is most definitely less energy than refining bauxite )
Creation of new jobs that helps keep the unemployment down.
Maximises the use of our limited resources.

I say all this, but I still think it was a dumb idea to pass laws banning the old light bulbs, I have yellow light bulbs on my decking to stop bugs being attracted.
I bought spares at under a dollar each of the old bulbs, as these are yellow a replacement CFL will set me back over $10 and I can tell you the saving in electricity and the slightly longer lifespan of the CFL doesn't offset the cost.
johnreid

Recycling of batteries and many other products keep toxic materials from building up in landfills too, Sadly many items that get tossed in the waste bin can often have deadly affects on water tables and other things that can come back and haunt us.
Alf

I personally find good old light bulbs more comfortable and safer...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescent_lamps_and_health

http://www.epa.gov/cfl/cflcleanup.html
Burnmafingers

One of the local manor houses I work in has in excess of 1000 100w lamps stockpiled in their cellar, along wirth copious amounts of quality wine, port and other booze  
Having not fully read all the comments in the thread, in the UK, 70w and 42w halogen type lamps are available to replace, allegedly with the same light output the old 100w and 42w lamps respectively. Trouble is though, they cost about 7 times as much as the old equivalent. Is this the case in other countries?
lendusaquid

Its just our unelected one world government flexing its muscles.
tmuir

Wallace wrote:

The downside was they were lucky to last 6months and even in that time they varied greatly. Some lasting a month, some 6.
I took them back to the shop and got a replacement. They blew and so on.

I'm still yet to try the phillips brand. The ones I am using are good besides the short life, but not out of pocket as I keep taking blown ones back.


Thanks for the idea of taking back CFLs that dont do what was promised on the box.
A week or two after you posted this message I had a bulb blow.
I put in a new one, and it lasted only a week.
I didn't have the recipt for that oen so didn't return itt, but did tape the receipt to the box for the ones I bough on the 27/1/12.
I used the first one in the box of 2 when I bought them.
The second I used on the 16/2/12 and it lasted until the 17/2/12.
I just returned the box, got my $12 back and bought another 2 pack.
I now tape the receipt to the box and using a permanent marker date the bulbs on their bases when I install them.
Light bulbs are going to cost me a lot less from now on as I am going to take back any bulb that lasts me less than a couple of years from now on as the box says 5 years on it.

These so called environmentally friendly bulbs cost me around $6 each compared to the old ones that cost me $1.
So to break even they need to save me $5 in electricity each.
1kW costs $0.21 where I live, so they need to save me just shy of 22kW during their lift time to break even.
The bulbs I used to use were 60 Watts, these ones are 15 Watts, so a saving of 45 Watts an hour.
22 0000 Watts / 45 Watts means it needs to last for around 488 hours to break even.
If I have the kitchen lights on for 3 hours a day this is 162 days, or around 5 1/2 months.

Bottom line is if the CFL light lasts me less than 6 months they cost me more than the incandescent lights.
I also would not always have the kitchen lights on for 3 hours a night, so a more true time frame would be around 9 months.
Most CFL lights do not give me this length of life span.
verithingeoff

tmuir wrote:

Light bulbs are going to cost me a lot less from now on as I am going to take back any bulb that lasts me less than a couple of years from now on as the box says 5 years on it.

Good tip Tony, I'll do this next time I buy bulbs, we find these new fangled things useless
MODmanMax

First I will declare My business is LED lights.
I started supplying LED lights for trucks and trailers.
The reliability is unquestionable compared to incandescent lights.
The cost is high but is out weighed by reliability.

I purchased my first CFL over 20 years ago, I still have one working out of a dozen or more. From memory they we about 10 to 20 times more expensive than what is on offer now.

LED,s are expensive for quality lights (not eBay all the stuff on offer here is 2 nd grade or old superceeded stock) and they will come down in price too. From what I have seen in the past few years they will get better too. CRI or Colour Rendition Index (the colour of objects under the light or the way they look) is more important than lumens in many cases. A CRI of 100 is the highest. I currently have LEDs with a CRI of 96. Most common LEDs are around 80. A blue or grey looking light will have a low CRI even though they will claim a high lumen output.

Power saving with either is unquestionable over any filament light.

The advice I give my customers is use a filament bulb where intermittent use is the norm and a quality energy saver where a light is on for long periods. This will give you the best energy savings.
In Western Australia the payback for an LED if used 8hrs per day is within 1 year.
10 watts for 10 hours is 100watt/hours
100watts for 1 hour is 100watt/hours

As for life expectancy, in the quest for cheaper products something has to give. Here you are at the mercy of the manufactures. How do you know they have used quality components? You don't that's why we have warranty. In Australia I am required to give 12 months on anything I sell. I don't want problems so I make sure I carry quality product to the best of my knowledge.

So my advice go to a reputable supplier who can help you out if you have problems.

Once upon a time only wealthy people could afford Mr Bell's electric light. Once the benefits became known the demand brought the cost down. The same is true for LED.

As for governments I think our thoughts are mutual there but unfortunately we keep voting them in.
Wallace

tmuir wrote:
Wallace wrote:

The downside was they were lucky to last 6months and even in that time they varied greatly. Some lasting a month, some 6.
I took them back to the shop and got a replacement. They blew and so on.

I'm still yet to try the phillips brand. The ones I am using are good besides the short life, but not out of pocket as I keep taking blown ones back.


Thanks for the idea of taking back CFLs that dont do what was promised on the box.
A week or two after you posted this message I had a bulb blow.
I put in a new one, and it lasted only a week.
I didn't have the recipt for that oen so didn't return itt, but did tape the receipt to the box for the ones I bough on the 27/1/12.
I used the first one in the box of 2 when I bought them.
The second I used on the 16/2/12 and it lasted until the 17/2/12.
I just returned the box, got my $12 back and bought another 2 pack.
I now tape the receipt to the box and using a permanent marker date the bulbs on their bases when I install them.
Light bulbs are going to cost me a lot less from now on as I am going to take back any bulb that lasts me less than a couple of years from now on as the box says 5 years on it.



Glad it worked for you Tony. I just took 2 back in the last week, I think they lasted about 3 months, they were a twin pack and went within a week of each other.
I bought them from Kmart. When I returned them I actually asked do they get many back and they said yes, all the time.
At that rate, a few years down the track manufacturers might lift their game when they realise it's possible to never have to buy a CFL lightbulb again once your house is decked out with them  

It's like most environmental friendly solutions. Seems like a good idea, when usually it isn't. Just look at the ethanol fuel situation  
redryder

Update Report:

I ordered in some bulbs from lightbulbsdirect.com suggested on the smokstak forum because they are made in the USA. I must say I was pleasantly sorprised when I opened up the box and found what felt like a much more solid built bulb. The glass is clearly thicker and the whole piece just feels more solid and heavier. My disappointment came when I tried it out. The 75 watt bulb gives off less light than my cheapo GE chinese made 40 watt light bulb. I have a watt meter so i tested both and the GE bulb draws 40.3 watts while the new one draws 65.8 watts or about 10 short of it's rating. I would not mind if the light was equal to any other 65-75 watt bulb but it isn't even as good as the 40 watt bulbs I am using now. The floodlights were better on the lighting and the dimmable CFL's (indoor floods) were just fine (I ordered a few of each). Unfortunately I will be returning the 100 watt and 75 watt standard light bulbs. I am keeping the incandescant floods and CFL's.

It makes no sense to pay the electric company twice as much for the same light for the priviledge of using American made light bulbs. We can do better than this. Sorry to say. I checked with the seller and they say I have purchased severe duty lights and they are not expected to put out the light of a standard bulb. (I wish I knew this in advance) They will take them back so they are clearly understanding and co-operative.

Also, does anyone know what kind of lighting (in incandescant watts) you get from those 110v chinese led corn lights? And do they put out a decent color of light?
MODmanMax

"Also, does anyone know what kind of lighting (in incandescant watts) you get from those 110v chinese led corn lights? And do they put out a decent color of light?"

Ask for figures on CRI, lumen and watts can be miss leading.

A high CRI will look better than a low CRI. High CRI LEDs are more expensive.

A higher wattage in LED can simply mean it gets hot. Cheap LEDs get hot and have a higher wattage.

Lumen figures are usually quoted on the ideal conditions for that LED chip.
Lumen should really only be quoted as a measure of light shining onto a surface( work bench) in a particular installation so you can compare one light source to another in that installation.

In summary a low wattage LED with a high CRI  will perform better and look better  than a high wattage LED with a low CRI.
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